The Eastern New Mexico News - Serving Clovis, Portales and the Surrounding Communities

City of Portales trying to find flooding fix

 

Courtesy photo: Bob Townsend Hayes Street in Portales remained flooded two days after Monday’s storm. The city’s Planning Department is trying to assess why the flooding has become severe in the past few years.

y Christina Calloway

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Residents of one Portales neighborhood call flooding on their street a nuisance, others aren’t complaining much. The city’s Planning Department, however, is trying to figure out what’s causing the lack of drainage.

Residents of Hayes Street say the water from a heavy downpour, such as Monday’s storm, which produced more than 2 inches of rain, can remain for days after the storm, often submerging their curbs.

link Courtesy photo: Bob Townsend

Hayes Street in Portales remained flooded two days after Monday’s storm. The city’s Planning Department is trying to assess why the flooding has become severe in the past few years.

On Friday afternoon, mud and dirt blanketed the street, leaving several parked vehicles with a dusted, brown finish. Resident Lee Holder, a gas company employee, said the water reached a few feet up his driveway.

“It was never this bad with smaller rains,” Holder said as he washed his truck. “It seems this happens when we get downpours instead of nice, steady rains.”

Holder describes the flooding as an inconvenience and a nuisance, but said it happens not too often.

Mindy Fuqua, a mother and full-time student, said her children took advantage of the “river” in front of her home by playing in the muddied water.

Fuqua said though the water didn’t do any damage to her home, she feels lucky to have a truck because the water was so high.

“If I drove a car, I’d be pretty upset,” Fuqua said.

Despite Fuqua’s positive attitude toward the flooding, the city’s Planning Director Sammy Standefer said the city has received complaints about the flooding on Hayes.

“We had problems with it one time last year and just the other day,” Standefer said.

Standefer said the area is not in a flood zone.

“Right now we’re trying to determine what’s happened that increases the water there,” he said. “There’s something that happened because we haven’t had that happen since last year."

Standefer said when that subdivision of the city was annexed it, the area was assessed and it did not flood as bad.

“Of course it depends on what’s the cause. Sometimes it’s easily fixed and sometimes it’s not. We’re just kind of in a low spot to begin with,” Standefer said. “If we discover there’s a way to do it easily, we’ll usually jump in and fix it.”

He added that no houses were reported being flooded but residents expressed concerns about their vehicles.

“The houses are safe, but it’s hard for cars to pass. The street is very full and it makes it difficult to get out. That’s the major complaint in the area,” Standefer said.

Lori Bohm, a real estate agent who represents property owners on the street, said she remembers city employees pumping the water out of the street last year when the area experienced a similar storm.

Bohm said she feels the problems fall back on the city’s Planning Committee, which recommended approving the subdivision.

“I don’t know who built that subdivision, but you have to have diversion channels,” Bohm said. “I’m sure they want it to where they can drive down the street. Obviously there is an issue there.”

 
 

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