The Eastern New Mexico News - Serving Clovis, Portales and the Surrounding Communities

Candidates weigh in on city bond election

Sitting commissioners prohibited from taking position

 

February 25, 2018



CLOVIS — City voters go to the polls March 6 to decide on three issues related to infrastructure and quality of life improvements.

If all three issues are approved, the costs will be $20 million.

Officials said sitting city commissioners are prohibited from taking a position on the ballot measures beyond providing information and urging residents to vote.

So The Eastern New Mexico News asked candidates on the ballot who are not currently sitting on the commission two questions:

Do you support the bond measures on the March 6 ballot, and why or why not?

Their answers:

Justin Hummer, District 4 candidate: “I support the one for Seventh Street, because I feel the infrastructure is very important. On the others, I don’t feel enough revenue will be created, and it’s not doing anything to increase employment opportunities.”

Rube Render, District 4 candidate: “The bonds are right where they need to be. Bond issues should be put before the public. I don’t think the public needs politicians to tell them how to vote.

“I think the voters are smart enough to look at the bonds, consider how they are affected and vote accordingly. I personally don’t like being told how to vote.”

David Bryant, District 3 candidate: “I do not support the bond issues. I don’t believe the city of Clovis’ taxes need to be raised at this time.

“The current budget is enough for infrastructure improvement. Any other needs for funding, we can go out for grants. It’s more in tune for gross receipts tax than property taxes, what they’re asking for.”

Jose Griego, District 3 candidate: Could not be reached for comment.

On the ballot

The questions presented to Clovis residents are, “Shall the city of Clovis issue up to ...”

• Question 1: “$10 million of general obligation bonds, to be repaid from property taxes, for the purpose of designing, constructing, repairing, preserving, rehabilitating, enhancing and otherwise improving roads?”

• Question 2: “$5 million ... for the purpose of designing, constructing, repairing, preserving, rehabilitating, enhancing and otherwise improving senior centers?”

• Question 3: “$5 million ... for the purpose of designing, constructing, repairing, preserving, rehabilitating, enhancing and otherwise improving wellness centers?”

What it means to taxpayers:

If all three questions related to the general obligation bonds are approved in the March 6 election, an additional $7.80 would be collected per $1,000 of taxable property value — measured in New Mexico as one-third of assessed property value.

Of that $7.80, Question 1 accounts for $3.90, while Questions 2 and 3 each account for $1.95.

A brochure from the city explains property tax impacts for homes of various values. A Clovis resident with a home assessed at $150,000 has five possible outcomes:

• $390 additional property tax annually if all three questions are approved.

• $292.50 additional property tax annually if Question 1 and either Question 2 or 3 are approved.

• $195 additional property tax annually if only Question 1 is approved, or if only Questions 2 and 3 are approved.

• $97.50 additional property tax annually if only Question 2 is approved or only Question 3 is approved.

• No tax change if all three questions fail.

 
 

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