The Eastern New Mexico News - Serving Clovis, Portales and the Surrounding Communities

Counting blessings requires careful thought

 

November 24, 2017

Curtis Shelburne

"The worst moment for an atheist," writes G. K. Chesterton, "is when he feels a profound sense of gratitude and has no one to thank."

Though any season is a great time for gratitude, Thanksgiving certainly lends itself at least to some thinking about the subject whether we're believers, agnostics, atheists, or anything-else-ists.

Even an unusually intelligent golden retriever might do well to ponder on Thanksgiving morning the fact that somebody makes sure that food shows up in his bowl and water in his dish (and, well, for goodness' sakes, what a nice meaty bone! Wonder what's the occasion? Woof!).

At least a little wag of the tail might be in order, I'd think, and I'm betting it would be more than a little one, since dogs seem to know instinctively that tail wags and gratitude are not items they need to hoard lest they run short.

More than "man's best friend," humans have, it seems to me, both a higher responsibility to think and to thank, and a much more serious temptation not to.

I'm told that the word "thank" comes from an older word related to "think." And, according to the Online Etymology Dictionary, "thank" is "related phonetically to 'think' as 'song' is to 'sing.'" So it would seem that even a very little thinking on our part would issue in "a profound sense of gratitude" and a great deal of thanksgiving.

Our hearts really do have a song they should be singing, a song of thanksgiving. "Count Your Many Blessings" was a far better song title than "Think and You'll Be Thanking," but it really does come to the same thing.

What's ironic here, and worth noting, is that those of us who seem to have the biggest boatload of blessings are often the very folks who are least likely to be genuinely thankful. Our "thanking" often suffers because our thinking is snotty, shoddy, and fatally flawed.

We tend to think that anyone else who has worked as hard as we have would naturally have as many blessings as we do.

We tend to think that anyone with a corresponding level of intelligence could certainly have made the same sorts of wise or profitable life or business decisions we've made.

We tend to think, though I hope we'd not say it, that we're a "cut above" average and thus more deserving than others. When we say "blessings," we mean something more akin to "wages, benefits, or dividends."

We tend to forget how much we have that no one can possibly earn.

We tend to forget about inconvenient items that no one can control such as bad genetics or pesky microbes or crazily dividing cells or hurricanes or dictators or senseless crimes or market meltdowns — and so much more.

Healthy, happy, and more than well fed, it's good that we've not bought into the self-defeating victim mentality that is such a scourge in our society, but buying into the "I'm my own god" mentality is just as deadly to genuine gratitude — and to our souls.

We've not created a single breath of our own air or spun this world an inch, much less given ourselves life.

It's a good time to do some good thinking and thus to be moved to lots of thanking. Most of all, it's a good time to genuinely thank God and try not to confuse him with the dim-witted pseudo-deity under our own hat.

Curtis Shelburne writes about faith for The Eastern New Mexico News. Contact him at: ckshel@aol.com

 

Reader Comments
(0)

 
 

Powered by ROAR Online Publication Software from Lions Light Corporation
© Copyright 2017