The Eastern New Mexico News - Serving Clovis, Portales and the Surrounding Communities

School leadership failed students

 

April 5, 2017



According to a story in The Eastern New Mexico News, a group of young girls at a cheerleading camp in Phoenix took nude videos of a teammate showering. It is difficult to comprehend the published line that states, “The teammates then made fun of the girl’s body and posted the video on Snapchat.”

Whatever term this mob of miscreants chooses to call themselves, “teammates” should be denied them.

The article goes on to denote that the girls involved used the coach’s phone to take the videos. Not only did the coach refuse to cooperate with the Phoenix police who were investigating the incident, she demanded that the victim of the bullying, “apologize to the teammates for overreacting to a joke,” and that she should, “get over it.”

Amazingly, West Mesa High School would not approve the girl’s transfer to another school until her parents signed a waiver indicating they would forfeit all claims against the school district. Per Russell Contreras’ article, “A spokeswoman for Albuquerque Public School said the district couldn’t comment on pending litigation, but the coach is no longer employed at the school.”

Question: Why are the high school principal and the district superintendent still employed?

Across the country in Montgomery County, Maryland, national attention has been focused on Rockville High School because of a rape that took place on school grounds during class time.

What I am discussing at this time has nothing to do with the immigration status of any students at the school.

Court documents indicate that two students allegedly dragged a 14-year-girl into a stall inside a boys’ bathroom and took turns raping her while classes were going on. Parents and community leaders are questioning how the alleged violence could have happened during school hours without anyone noticing.

Apparently realizing no incongruity whatsoever, Dr. Jack Smith, superintendent of schools, issued a statement that said in part, “While MCPS has a robust security system that includes thousands of cameras in schools, school- and central office- based security personnel, engaged teachers and administrators, and a partnership with the Montgomery County Police Department, we must always consider opportunities to improve school safety.”

Thousands of cameras in schools, school and central office-based security personnel, engaged teachers and administrators, and a partnership with the Montgomery County Police Department missed the entire occurrence.

In a classic case of slamming the door after the equine is well on its way, Smith announced the district would begin security assessments focusing first on its 25 high schools.

Question: Why are the high school principal and the district superintendent still employed?

Rube Render is the Curry County Republican chairman. Contact him at: [email protected]

 
 

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