Candidate Q&As: Curry County Magistrate Judge, District 1

 


Terry Martin and Nicole Roybal, both Democrats, are seeking a four-year term as Curry County magistrate judge for District 1.

Duane Castleberry is the incumbent, who is not seeking re-election.

Candidates were given the same questions, and asked to answer them on the spot.

Absentee voting began last week and will take place Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. until June 1 and from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on June 2 at the Curry County Administrative Complex.

Early voting begins Saturday and will be available Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the North Plains Mall — Police Substation.

The primary is June 5.

The annual salary for the magistrate judge position is $89,907.79.

Terry Martin is a building inspector for the city of Clovis.

Summarize your understanding of the job description for magistrate judge.

Basically, it is kind of like the pre-court, where they handle the cases and also civil cases prior to going forward to the district court.

What professional experience, or otherwise, have you had that you feel qualifies you for this position?

Basically, I have served the public for over 40 years for Clovis. I feel that I am pretty well versed at city codes and laws and feel that I would be a great asset to the court system here.

Have you ever been arrested and/or charged with a crime? If so, when, what were the details and what was the disposition?

No.

Have you ever been involved in a civil lawsuit, either as plaintiff or defendant? If so, when, what were the details and what was the disposition?

No.

What is your relationship with local law enforcement?

Basically I’m a chaplain, put it that way, but other than that, no relationship. As chaplain, we’re there (for law enforcement) just in case, for notification of deaths.

Do you have any professional or personal relationships or history that might result in potential for conflicts of interest if you’re elected magistrate judge?

No.

Why do you want this job?

Basically, I would like for us to see in our court system some diversity or reflection of what our city is made of, and that’s pretty much the main reason for that. Other than that I feel I’ll be fair, honest in dealing with any cases.

Nicole Roybal is a certified paralegal for a local criminal defense attorney.

Summarize your understanding of the job description for magistrate judge.

My understanding of this position is to oversee a caseload that consists of civil suits less than $10,000, and criminal cases, (misdemeanors and petty misdemeanors) and preliminary examinations for felony cases and arraignments on all cases before they get to district court.


What professional experience, or otherwise, have you had that you feel qualifies you for the this position?

To start with, my mom started Teen Court here in Clovis when I was in fifth grade. So I have essentially grown up in a courtroom. In teen court, I volunteered for all positions, from bailiff to juror to attorney. Once I graduated with my degree in legal studies, I actually got to participate as a teen court judge.


I am also employed as a certified paralegal. I am one of only two NALA, which is a nationally recognized certified paralegal, in the area. I have been working with attorneys since 2008, but prior to that I did two internships.

So I have about 12 years of experience working with lawyers. One specifically now has a public defender contract and we did 90 percent criminal work.

Have you ever been arrested and/or charged with a crime? If so, when, what were the details and what was the disposition?

Never.

Have you ever been involved in a civil lawsuit, either as plaintiff or defendant? If so, when, what were the details and what was the disposition?

Not that I can recall.

What is your relationship with local law enforcement?

I work for a criminal defense attorney, so I will say that law enforcement has a very important job. I respect all law enforcement. My run-ins with them usually are if I am assisting with an interview that (Attorney Mickie Patterson) is doing, or if I am needing discovery and have to contact their office. Other than that I don’t have any real run-ins with law enforcement.


Do you have any professional or personal relationships or history that might result in potential for conflicts of interest if you’re elected magistrate judge?

No. I have no relatives that work directly in law enforcement. I believe that there is always potential for conflict when you’ve lived in Clovis pretty much all of your life, but as a professional you learn to deal with conflicts.

Why do you want this job?

I always knew from very early on that I wanted to be a magistrate court judge, because magistrate court judges have a very important job although most people don’t understand what they do.

A traffic ticket, you can always go see Judge Jan Garrett down in municipal court, and if you commit a felony obviously you’re going to see Judge Drew Tatum or Judge Matt Chandler up in district court. But there is an in-between place where you have an opportunity to have a second chance, or learn a lesson, or possibly bring someone in that owes you money and take care of those things. …

I think magistrate court judges have an important role because they have an opportunity to make decisions that assist in someone’s life. That’s really the reason why I want the job.

I believe that I have the experience and the common sense to do well in this position and treat all cases the same and base all decisions on the merits of the case and no outside information.

— Compiled by Staff Writer David Grieder

 

Reader Comments
(0)

 
 

Powered by ROAR Online Publication Software from Lions Light Corporation
© Copyright 2017

Rendered 05/22/2018 22:02